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Fall 2015 courses

Courses for Preston Residential College residents only!

Preston Residential College is excited to offer courses for our residents in Fall 2015. These courses cover a number of Carolina Core requirements in a small class environment.

Our residents are not required to sign up for any of these courses, but are highly encouraged to do so!

 

COURSE
SEATS
DAYS
TIME
LOCATION
INSTRUCTOR
UNIV101.A01
19
M/W
2:20p-3:35p
PRESTON 125
S. Kelly
UNIV101.A02
19
T/TH
4:25p-5:40p
PRESTON 125
R. Lloyd

U101 is an award-winning three credit hour course designed to help you make a successful transition to the University of South Carolina, both academically and personally. It aims to foster a sense of belonging, promotes engagement in the curricular and co-curricular life of the University, highlights what the University and its faculty expect from students, and helps you develop and apply critical thinking skills. U101 provides a unique introduction to USC, and serves as a great way to learn and interact with students and faculty in the Preston Residential College community. Both sections are taught by Preston Residential College staff members.


COURSE
SEATS
DAYS
TIME
LOCATION
INSTRUCTOR
ENGL101.A24
22
M/W/F
12:00p-12:55p
DMSB 126
A . Berry

Reading and Writing about The American Dream
This course will examine American literature and media ranging from music videos and commercials to contemporary essays to classic novels in an effort to understand how class, the rise of consumer culture, and status symbols shaped the thought and ideals of generations past and present.  We will evaluate, criticize, and celebrate past as well as living writers who seek to uphold, abolish, or otherwise complicate the “American Dream.”  We will look closely at consumer culture and conspicuous consumption—especially among middle and upper class citizens who embrace status symbols, excessive recreational activities, and idle time as markers of the "American Dream."  Our class will also question how race and family traditions, sex and drugs as consumer statements, and youth frivolity shape classic and contemporary American writing.

Fulfills Carolina Core CMW